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Achieving balance

Achieving balance

A North Sydney dentist reveals how he achieves balance in his life.

Post by Dr Jeff Brown

As a health professional, I guess it’s no surprise that I feel strongly about health and wellbeing and fitness. I exercise six days a week. I usually go to the gym, go swimming, kickboxing, and go running. I know that sounds like a lot, but I make time for it in the mornings before I start work. I can do that because I’m an early bird by my nature.

Dr Jeff BrownI like to cross train to make it interesting for myself, and it’s good for the body because you can use different muscle groups. Cross training, or circuit training, was originally developed for athletes who were doing types of training in sports other than the one they competed in. The goal was to take advantage of any particularly effective training methods from those other sports, while negating any disadvantages. It’s become a lot more popular nowadays in general fitness training, and aims to eliminate that problem of only having one muscle group worked by one particular exercise. If you just run all the time, you only use those muscles.

So cross training is a very effective way of conditioning different muscle groups, developing new skills, and tackling that natural boredom that comes in if you do the same routine over and over again. You’re less likely to get a repetitive strain injury if you’re varying your routine, and gives you the option of  changing your training routine if, for example, you do get an injury, or if the pool or the gym is closed.

But it’s not just about the kind of exercises you’re doing, or the muscle groups you’re targeting, when you cross-train. Also, by doing it all, you’re achieving a balance in your health and wellbeing, and I think balance is important.

There are many different ways you can work to achieving balance in your life. I also meditate, which is another way of maintaining that balance.

Achieving balance

Achieving balance

A North Sydney dentist reveals how he achieves balance in his life.

Post by Dr Jeff Brown

As a health professional, I guess it’s no surprise that I feel strongly about health and wellbeing and fitness. I exercise six days a week. I usually go to the gym, go swimming, kickboxing, and go running. I know that sounds like a lot, but I make time for it in the mornings before I start work. I can do that because I’m an early bird by my nature.

Dr Jeff BrownI like to cross train to make it interesting for myself, and it’s good for the body because you can use different muscle groups. Cross training, or circuit training, was originally developed for athletes who were doing types of training in sports other than the one they competed in. The goal was to take advantage of any particularly effective training methods from those other sports, while negating any disadvantages. It’s become a lot more popular nowadays in general fitness training, and aims to eliminate that problem of only having one muscle group worked by one particular exercise. If you just run all the time, you only use those muscles.

So cross training is a very effective way of conditioning different muscle groups, developing new skills, and tackling that natural boredom that comes in if you do the same routine over and over again. You’re less likely to get a repetitive strain injury if you’re varying your routine, and gives you the option of  changing your training routine if, for example, you do get an injury, or if the pool or the gym is closed.

But it’s not just about the kind of exercises you’re doing, or the muscle groups you’re targeting, when you cross-train. Also, by doing it all, you’re achieving a balance in your health and wellbeing, and I think balance is important.

There are many different ways you can work to achieving balance in your life. I also meditate, which is another way of maintaining that balance.