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The more things change…

The more things change…

The technology in dentistry just gets better and better.

Post by Dr Jack Obaid, dentist

The profession of dentistry hasn’t really changed since I started. But on thing that I have noticed is the technology is making me, as a dentist, better and more efficient. I’m excited about CAD CAM technology. CAD stands for computer-aided design, and CAM is for computer-aided manufacturing. Dr Jack ObaidIn dentistry it’s used to create crowns, veneers, inlays, bridges and more. Although the technology has been around for years, it was often cumbersome to use—but now you can have it all done much more quickly and accurately. Typically, the restorations are milled from a solid block of ceramic or composite resin, which is the same (or very similar colour) to the rest of your teeth.

Although it requires a couple of visits—one to place a temporary crown, for example, then a second to place the real thing that has been created by a dental laboratory—this system allows us to offer the very best type of restoration. Porcelain is known to be the most aesthetic hard wearing material available when it comes to restoring a broken down tooth or improving a less than perfect smile.

In orthodontics we’re nearly at a point where we won’t have to take impressions any more. In the past, if you were an orthodontist you needed access to a lot of storage space to hang on to all those plaster moulds you made of patients’ teeth! That doesn’t have to happen anymore—patient records can be stored in digital form. We’re also currently looking at some evolving technology that does 3D scans, which is really necessary when treatment planning for Invisalign. You also use it to give data to a lab, which can mill a perfect crown really quickly. That results in you getting your best smile much quicker than you could in the past.

The more things change…

The more things change…

The technology in dentistry just gets better and better.

Post by Dr Jack Obaid, dentist

The profession of dentistry hasn’t really changed since I started. But on thing that I have noticed is the technology is making me, as a dentist, better and more efficient. I’m excited about CAD CAM technology. CAD stands for computer-aided design, and CAM is for computer-aided manufacturing. Dr Jack ObaidIn dentistry it’s used to create crowns, veneers, inlays, bridges and more. Although the technology has been around for years, it was often cumbersome to use—but now you can have it all done much more quickly and accurately. Typically, the restorations are milled from a solid block of ceramic or composite resin, which is the same (or very similar colour) to the rest of your teeth.

Although it requires a couple of visits—one to place a temporary crown, for example, then a second to place the real thing that has been created by a dental laboratory—this system allows us to offer the very best type of restoration. Porcelain is known to be the most aesthetic hard wearing material available when it comes to restoring a broken down tooth or improving a less than perfect smile.

In orthodontics we’re nearly at a point where we won’t have to take impressions any more. In the past, if you were an orthodontist you needed access to a lot of storage space to hang on to all those plaster moulds you made of patients’ teeth! That doesn’t have to happen anymore—patient records can be stored in digital form. We’re also currently looking at some evolving technology that does 3D scans, which is really necessary when treatment planning for Invisalign. You also use it to give data to a lab, which can mill a perfect crown really quickly. That results in you getting your best smile much quicker than you could in the past.